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Sunday, July 29, 2012

BELDEN NORMAN NAMAH MUST FORM GOVERNMENT

By GRAHAM ROBINSON

Indeed Papua New Guinea has a lot to offer to its people with its multi-billion kina projects stemming from its rich soil and hold to this day that government who will create an equal distribution of wealth amongst its citizens with a strong future for all.

Over the last ten months Papua New Guinea experienced a change in government with a major policy re-introduced; FREE EDUCATION embraced by the low to middle income earners distributed amongst the rural and urban folk in Papua New Guinea.
 Papua New Guinea will see change in the next 5 years; and despite the invisible fence that currently divide our support between two leaders, we must look forward to change.
The desire for change in Papua New Guinea has echoed down three and a half generations despite our society’s transformation from primitive isolation to being one of the richest economies in the world.
Change in inevitable and will continue to do so but at a cost we are bearing at this time.
Looking more closely in the last 10 months a blessing we cursed and continue to do so indeed gain momentum by unprecedented events we were never accustomed to.

We actually experienced a transition where legal interpretation labelled; criminal in nature, investigative journalism promoted as bad leadership stirring social media to become the courts.
Someone had to be blamed and we chose a young and vibrant leader who was ready to speak out boldly on corruption within the very system we cried foul over, time and time again.

We labelled him corrupt for orchestrating the demise of the former government.
A military mutiny shook this country yet was quickly quelled by the very same leader who took it all on himself before being criticized for over stepping his boundaries.
The arrest of the chief justice was the final straw in judging him a dictator when judicial corruption exposed itself through leaked emails.

A system that needed an overhaul was not be accepted by the general public because we were afraid.
He was the same person who believed change could be achieved after being sent to jail for saving 300,000 plus lives during one of our lowest times in history when the very government of the day fought our very own, stopping at nothing with genocide providing the ultimate decision only to be prevented with conscience by the same man and his band of followers who believed it was right.
A short political career saw him climb so fast to becoming the deputy prime minister of this country with political commentators labelling him a rookie for his outbursts because we wanted diplomacy and integrity for those who had none.

And then we took turns in brandishing him with names with profanity at its lowest.
But did anyone think for a minute why a multi-millionaire would decide to join government politics and steer it to being the most vibrant in the world through fighting corruption head on?
Yet shamelessly we aimed at destroying him elsewhere.

And still at this juncture the very same leaders who had the chance to bring change on a grandeur scale years ago failed us ordinary Papua New Guineans through poor government service delivery promoting a disease that crippled our economy, eat and live in the same camp with the very one who once shared his vision.
And yet we cry; Change for Papua New Guinea increasingly blinded the rule of law trampled not written by God.

Change must come despite the intensity for results to be seen. There’s no turning back, nor must change be expected as miracle or through smooth transition where corruption of the highest degree is camouflaged.
Change must come through unprecedented events because it involves those closer even closest to us.

We must not be afraid to accept this fate our birth right; born into this God forsaken country where only the 10% benefit whilst the 90 live in uncertainty and gloom.
Whilst we pray for change it must come at a price.

And by God’s grace he will need power to set a new direction for this nation.
Yet we ridicule him as someone fighting for power but isn’t power a tool in bringing change?
Isn’t power a catalyst in reforming our policies?
Isn’t power a right in fixing that already damaged?

Papua New Guinea needs the same man many despise and hate who has done nothing wrong like those on the other side who have squandered millions, ordering genocide against their own, destroying young leaders with a dirty history of hiding those who conspired in stealing from their very own.