James Marape's Missteps Openly Exposed at Australian Forum


by MICHAEL J. PASSINGAN 

In a recent event that highlighted the complexities of international diplomacy and governance, Papua New Guinea's Prime Minister, James Marape, faced a challenging situation during his appearance at the Lowy Institute in Sydney, Australia. The Lowy Institute, known for its role as an independent think tank focusing on international policy, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region, provided a platform for a candid assessment of Marape's governance.

Following his formal address, Marape engaged in a dialogue with Dr. Michael Fullilove AM, the Executive Director of the Institute. Dr. Fullilove, a respected figure in public and international policy, scrutinized Marape's past promises and statements, contrasting them with the current state of affairs in Papua New Guinea (PNG).

The discussion took a critical turn as Dr. Fullilove revisited Marape's 2019 speech at the same venue, where Marape had outlined his vision for PNG in a speech titled “A New Book for Papua New Guinea.” The contrast between the promises made then and the current reality in PNG, especially regarding economic and security issues, was stark. This juxtaposition was not lost on the audience, as the Lowy Institute had published multiple reports on these subjects.

A key moment occurred when Dr. Fullilove questioned Marape about internal security in PNG and the assistance needed under a recent security pact with Australia. Marape's response, marked by visible discomfort and evasive maneuvers, suggested a failure to address significant law and order issues that he had pledged to tackle four years earlier.

The Prime Minister's apparent lack of composure and his struggle to articulate responses were noted by attendees. Observers commented on his frequent use of the word 'space', perceived forced smiles, and body language that betrayed his discomfort. This moment was seen as emblematic of broader issues within PNG's leadership and governance, raising questions about Marape's ability to fulfill his commitments and effectively lead the nation.

Marape's appearance at the Lowy Institute thus turned into a sobering reflection on his leadership. His difficulty in addressing critical questions and defending his record suggested a gap between his rhetoric and the realities of governance in PNG. The event underscored the challenges leaders face when their public promises are held up against their actual performance, particularly in the international arena.

This incident also highlights the essential role of think tanks and independent institutions in facilitating critical dialogues and holding public figures accountable. The event at the Lowy Institute serves as a reminder of the famous quote attributed to Abraham Lincoln: "You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you can not fool all of the people all of the time."

Marape's experience at the Lowy Institute is a case study in the complexities of political leadership and the importance of integrity and accountability in public office. It also reflects the intricate dynamics of international relations and the influence of policy institutes in shaping public discourse.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

HIGHLANDS FRAUD F*CKS RUNNING GOVERNMENT AGENCY,,,

AUGUSTINE MANO PNG'S PREMIER CORPORATE CROOK

PNG, VERY RICH YET STILL A VERY VERY POOR COUNTRY

BLIND LEADING THE BLIND, WHY THE PNG ECONOMY STILL SUCKS

A Call for Local Ownership and Fairness

MARAPE & PAITA ABOUT TO SIGN AWAY PNG GOLD